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Dangerous TikTok Skincare Trends 2021: Dermatologists Warn Against These Viral Trends

Dermatologists Warn Against These Viral TikTok Skincare Trends
(Photo : Velizar Ivanov/Unsplash) Using baking soda as a mask is a huge no-no.


TikTok has been a massive source of makeup and skincare trends. Thanks to influencers like Hyram, followers can sometimes make or break brands with a single opinion. Millions of TikTokers are quick to try whatever it takes to get perfect skin. While there are trends that are dermatologist-approved, many are dangerous and not worth the risk. Below, dermatologists warn against these viral skincare trends on TikTok.

TikTok Skincare Trends 2021 To Avoid

Baking Soda Mask

YouTube channel Mixed Makeup consulted dermatology resident physician Dr. Muneeb Shah on several TikTok skincare trends. One of those is using baking soda on skin. Dr. Shah is against this trend saying that baking soda has a pH level of over 8. Our skin's normal pH level is 5.5. Baking soda is a base and is way harsher than acids. Dr. Shah warns that using baking soda will damage the lipid barrier of the skin. For effective exfoliation, stick to alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) like glycolic or lactic acid or beta hydroxy acids (BHAs) like salicylic acid.

DIY Microneedling

Dr. Shah qualifies this TikTok skincare trends as "very dangerous." Microneedling is a technique that punctures the skin to boost collagen production and promote healing. However, you'll be risking infection in an uncontrolled environment and with using random movements with a microneedling device. The depth of the needles is also a major issue and you may be using the wrong one. You'll end up with a damaged skin barrier and that's a hard thing to repair. Microneedling is best left to professionals at a dermatologist's office.

ALSO READ: Dermatologists Teach You How To Get Clearer Skin Without Spending A Fortune

Face Waxing

Several viral TikTok videos from a barbershop called Kapsalon Freedom caught the attention of dermatologists and licensed estheticians. Barbers are seen coating clients' face with hot wax. They also insert wax covered Q-tips into the nose and ears to remove hairs. Remember that these barbers are trained for this procedure. The British Association of Dermatologists (BAD) tells In The Know that trying this at home can seriously damage the skin. Aside from possible burns, you're risking the very delicate skin around the eyes. They also don't recommend applying hot wax inside your nose and ears. If you think you have excessive facial hair, go to a professional for this waxing procedure.

Skin Icing

While applying ice on skin has long been done to reduce inflammation, cosmetic dermatologist Dr. Mariana Vergara tells Popsugar that she considers this too drastic for sensitive facial skin. Dr. Vergara concedes that skin icing decreases inflammation. However, it also widens the blood vessels and increases the blood flow. Sensitive skin will be prone to flushes and redness, especially for those who have rosacea. She adds that if you want to try this trend, go for a cold compress or a cooling face mask instead. Those products are less extreme in temperature.

Slugging

Slugging is a popular practice in Korea. It's simply using petroleum jelly, like Vaseline, to seal in all your moisturizing products. However, Dr. Vergara advices those with oily and acne-prone skin to skip this trend. Vaseline can be heavy on the face and will potentially clog your pores. Clogged pores always lead to more breakouts.

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